Lecture Notes: Post-Perspective

‘Eternal Forest’ by Charles Avery

‘Eternal Forest’ by Charles Avery

My first constellation session was lectured by Dr. Jon Clarkson who explored the idea the perspective in art. Such perspectives include historic, human, non-human or perhaps a piece that presents multiple perspectives which can’t be all comprehended at the same time. Of course I’m not really doing it justice but I my thoughts, I found this lecture very interesting putting something in light which is always present in our work; however honestly I don’t feel compelled to further research this topic although been more consciously aware of perspective and how it can be played and manipulated with sure will help in my future works. Before I go I leave you a piece called ‘Eternal Forest’ by Charles Avery, a piece which plays with the ideas laid here quite nicely.

Lecture Notes!


Study Skills: Reading and Analysis

My first study session was taught by the same lecturer I had today, Dr. Jon Clarkson (…)


Day One of Constellation

Today I was introduced to the constellation and study skills sessions I will be partaking in throughout the next 3 years which will result (gulp..) in a dissertation of a subject of my choosing. Looking at the smaller picture I will essentially be exposed to a large number of study subjects throughout this year to help me decide upon a question or point of study I want to answer which will result in a essay (for submission) at the end of the year. With the formalities out the way, to be exposed to so much in one day is rather intimidating but at least I know what I’ve got myself into. Not too much more to say so, I will be leaving a “virtual” copy of my notes at the end of every constellation post for my reference and your curiosity (don’t expect any legibility).

Lecture Notes!


In the Studio

Image of Form Task Result

Form Task


Day One and a Museum Visit

Three Pieces

Drawing

Drawing

Photograph

Photograph

 Written Description (unedited):

“The Peasant Family

We are presented with the scene of a ostensibly typical peasant family. A dusty haze de-saturates dusky tones kicked up from the dirt road on which they stand.

Two figures, with blurred faces blend backwards into the building behind – comparatively ill defined, a small child clutched between them. Struggling in their grasp, she faces downwards, not out. The viewer is irrelevance in her rejection of the portrait.

Face twisted in anger, frustration, she breaks free from the foreground claiming the frame for her rebellion. “